A man has been arrested after armed police surrounded a property in Middlesbrough Town Centre;

Over 130 Teesside groups have signed an open letter calling for the government to save the region's steel industry;

...and Tees Valley Mayor Ben Houchen has vowed to save Middlesbrough's iconic Tees Transporter Bridge and end its uncertain future.

 

A man has been arrested after armed police surrounded a property in Middlesbrough Town Centre.

Armed officers were seen on Woodlands Road, just metres from the Teesside University campus, responding to an incident.

Several officers wearing National Crime Agency jackets were stationed outside a property, alongside a number of unmarked vehicles, before being seen entering the building.

The incident began around 10.30am yesterday.

A National Crime Agency spokesperson confirmed that a 29-year-old man had been arrested on suspicion of firearms offences and was taken to Middlesbrough Police Station, where he remains in custody.

 

Over 130 Teesside groups have signed an open letter calling for the government to save the region's steel industry.

Businesses, community groups, and sports and social clubs alike have signed the letter asking for the Government to "save our steel" - saying it is "crunch time" for the future of the region.

The letter asks for people from all sides of the political spectrum to commit to securing the industry’s long-term future on Teesside amid uncertainty.

British Steel - which is now owned by Chinese giant Jingye after being bought out of bankruptcy - still employs hundreds of workers at its sites in Lackenby, near Redcar, and Skinningrove.

This letter follows the firm's announcement of a string of consultations over plans to bring an electric arc furnace to Teesside next to its Beam Mill at Lackenby.

The radical plans - subject to appropriate support from the government - would see two furnaces come into operation by late 2025 - one at Teesside and another in Scunthorpe.

 

Tees Valley Mayor Ben Houchen has vowed to save Middlesbrough's iconic Tees Transporter Bridge and end its uncertain future.

The 112-year-old bridge has been closed since 2019 after a string of safety concerns and problems with its structure.

But now Mayor Houchen has pledged to save and fund the repair of the Grade II* listed giant of the Teesside skyline and work has already commenced ahead of a proposal being brought to cabinet in January to approve the project.

Until it closed in 2019, the Transporter was the longest working bridge of its kind in the world.

The repairs will be funded from the £1billion of new money for transport allocated to the Tees Valley following the scrapping of HS2.


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