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Police have named a woman who was found dead in a house in Ormesby on Monday;

Police are appealing for information after a property was burgled on Netherfields Crescent in Middlesbrough;

...and a project that will see public sector buildings kept warm by green heat produced in the Tees Valley has been officially launched by Mayor Ben Houchen.

 

Police have named a woman who was found dead in a house in Ormesby on Monday.

She is 49 year old Barbie Pigg who lived at the address in Dorothy Street.

Inquiries into the circumstances surrounding Barbie’s death are on-going and police are appealing for anyone who saw her in and around the area before her death to get in touch.

Two people arrested in connection with Barbie’s death, which is being treated as unexplained, have been released under investigation while inquiries continue.

 

Police are appealing for information after a property was burgled on Netherfields Crescent in Middlesbrough.

The incident was reported to police on Thursday but the burglary is believed to have occurred sometime over the past week.

Mattresses from beds were stolen from the property along with children’s toys, wrapped Christmas presents, a TV, DVD player, a digital SKY box, women’s and children’s clothes, a bottle of whiskey and a coin collection which both have sentimental value.

Damage was also caused to the inside of the property.

Enquiries are ongoing and any witnesses or anyone who may have been offered the stolen items for sale are asked to contact PC Dannii Dixon on the non-emergency number 101, or Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.

 

A project that will see public sector buildings kept warm by green heat produced in the Tees Valley has been officially launched by Mayor Ben Houchen.

The Mayor and the Tees Valley Combined Authority have led the development of a £40million scheme, focused around the town centre in Middlesbrough.

The scheme could use some of the waste heat from local industry to warm public sector buildings, delivering energy savings and significant carbon savings while reducing energy costs.

The James Cook University Hospital will be the first complex to benefit from the district heating project. Over a 40-year lifespan, the project is expected to save the hospital a significant sum on its energy bills, and around 8,000 tonnes of carbon per year.


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